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  1. #21
    czech me out. owlsgo's Avatar
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    1. On average how involved/interested are people in your country in/about the political happenings in your country?
    in australia, voting is compulsory. some people see it as a burden and obligation but it generally thought of as a right and responsibility. i'd say 25% of people are interested and do nothing, another 25% are interested and active, and the rest take the laid back aussie stance.

    2. On average how involved/interested are you in/about the political happenings in your country?
    i'm quite interested. i vote, i read local and national papers as well as alternative views in order to gain a well rounded view. i like to communicate with the local government in order to get my ideas across to the wider government.

    3. How many major political parties are there in your country?
    it depends. there are a a few major. the Greens, Labour(which is more liberal or democratic), Liberal(which is more national or republican), and the Nationals. but the forerunners are Liberal and Labour.

    4. What is the relationship between religion and government in your country?
    there are some parties that take a strong stance on religion, whether positive or negative. the major parties tend to shy away from talk of religion, however it's quite clear to me that religion, more specifically christianity, dictates the goings on.

    5. In your opinion do the general morals of your country differ from those of America? If so, to what extent?
    the general core morals or many, if not all countries, are similar. and in that respect i agree with them. but america, and again many countries, stray from their morals or take them to an extreme extent.

    6. Does the average person in your country have a lot of say in the political happenings of the government? Is this more or less than that of Americans?
    there is alot of complaining but less doing. even so, i believe it's more than in america.

    7. Are you afraid of your government? Are you afraid the American government?
    no, but i am afraid of the american government.

    8. Are you satisfied with performance of your government? What do you think needs to be changed? Do you think that it is doing better or worse than that of the American government?
    in australia there's been a recent change-over. and i believe the new government is doing very well. better than the american government. the american government has seemed to halt on many important issues and is focussing on a narrow range of topics.

    9. Do you feel that each person has a responsibility to participate in the political process?
    yes. it's a right that has been fought for by many people. in some places, people still don't have the right to vote or speak out. it's a responsibility.

    be daring, be different, be impractical,
    be anything that will assert integrity of purpose
    and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers,
    the creatures of commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary.

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  3. #22
    The Man on Ice 261311's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste
    Is your "awesome mayor" by any chance...Hazel McCallion?
    Just a stab in the dark.
    Haha, so you know where I live yeah, she's much better than David Miller.
    With much love, 261311.

    Quote Originally Posted by JT.
    Maybe it's implying yoshi is an animal, and not just a mutated green prostitute mario likes to ride
    -=Join the Waluigi Fan Club=-


  4. #23
    Controversial. DRMARIO's Avatar
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    1. On average how involved/interested are people in your country in/about the political happenings in your country?
    Very involved. British citizens want the best for their country, and that's why there's such a big fuss with Gordon Brown at the moment.
    2. On average how involved/interested are you in/about the political happenings in your country?
    Not really involved at all, I'm too young to vote..But I do read the Guardian most days..and I do believe in SOME benefits of the BNP.
    3. How many major political parties are there in your country?
    Three/Four
    4. What is the relationship between religion and government in your country?
    Well, a vast majority is christian..Our ex-prime minister Tony Blair has just officially turned catholic..afte years of suppoting gay marriage and abortion.
    5. In your opinion do the general morals of your country differ from those of America? If so, to what extent?
    I can't think that it was that different..
    6. Does the average person in your country have a lot of say in the political happenings of the government? Is this more or less than that of Americans?
    Yes, everybody I know are concerned for our country, and are not too pleased with the current happenings within the goverment.
    7. Are you afraid of your government? Are you afraid the American government?
    I'm not afraid of our government,nor is any other british citizen. We're not afraid of the american government.
    8. Are you satisfied with performance of your government? What do you think needs to be changed? Do you think that it is doing better or worse than that of the American government?
    No I'm not. I think we need to be tighter on people immigrating here. England no longer has an english culture..which to me, is a great great shame. Such a grand country..turned into a haven for foreigners and asylum seekers.
    Australia only let in people who they think will benefit the country..and these people have to undergo interviews. That's a good thing to do! But we seem to be just letting everyone in, and I do believe that in the future..they'll
    be uproar and the BNP will be voted in.
    9. Do you feel that each person has a responsibility to participate in the political process?
    If you're allowed to vote, do it. Everybody should want the best for their country.

    Enoch was right.


  5. #24
    Senior Member Napalmbrain's Avatar
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    1. On average how involved/interested are people in your country in/about the political happenings in your country?

    There seems to be quite a bit of interest. Although the UK would appear apathetic with a voter turnout is typically less than 50%, this seems to be more down to dislike of the major parties and the unfair "first past the post" system, which leads many people to think it's pointless voting. Just look at the support for some campaigns in the media and you'll see the British public isn't as apathetic as it would initially appear.

    2. On average how involved/interested are you in/about the political happenings in your country?

    I would say I'm somewhat interested, I tend to keep up with events and such. However, as there is no large party that shares my political view (classical liberalism), I'm not greatly interested.

    3. How many major political parties are there in your country?

    Three: Labour, a previously socialist party who have now taken to the centre ground, the Conservatives, who as their name suggest as are typically conservative on most issues (not to the extent of the USA's Republican party though) and the Liberal Democrats, who are obviously a liberal party. The Lib Dems have not yet been in power, but they command enough sway to be important in elections.

    4. What is the relationship between religion and government in your country?

    Limited, but it's there. Most of it is a result of archaic laws that were written many years ago, but these days the government usually prefers to stay out of religious affairs as they risk alienating the public, which largely isn't very concerned with religion when there are "more important" issues to be dealt with. Occasionally they will get involved (such as the recent religious discrimination law), but when they do they will tend to avoid favouring Christianity. Britain has a fairly sizable proportion of Muslims and non-religious people, and those that are Christian generally don't tend to express it as much as in the US.

    5. In your opinion do the general morals of your country differ from those of America? If so, to what extent?

    They tend to differ with American morals on "religious" issues (e.g. there's a lot more support for stem cell research, abortion, gay marriage etc.) because like I mentioned just now, people here aren't all that interested in religion. That said, Britain is probably closer to American morals than any other first-world country.

    6. Does the average person in your country have a lot of say in the political happenings of the government? Is this more or less than that of Americans?

    The average British person has limited say over what goes on in government, less than the average American that's for sure, however politicians can sometimes be scared into doing something by hysterical newspaper campaigns (not often though). Political decisions in the UK usually reflect the opinions of those in parliament rather than the public. Take the ban on fox hunting for example. Although personally I think it's barbaric and would be glad to see the end of it, most people in the UK did not want it banned, but the government did so anyway.

    7. Are you afraid of your government? Are you afraid the American government?

    Yes to both. Given how I've described our government as incompetent and selfish, I don't trust people like that making all the decisions which can effect our lives.

    As for America, although I actually agree with toppling despotic regimes like the Taliban and Saddam Hussein's government, I still believe they have far too much power on the international stage. As the only current superpower in the world (though the EU and China look set to eventually become superpowers as well), America can throw its weight around and get its way, or just ignore the majority consensus anyway.

    8. Are you satisfied with performance of your government? What do you think needs to be changed? Do you think that it is doing better or worse than that of the American government?

    I think they're largely a bunch of lying, backstabbing toe-rags who are only interested in getting the money and freebies that come with the job. I think we should scrap the "first past the post" system of voting and change to some sort of proportional representation, so that the government more accurately reflects the votes cast.

    I don't think Britain's government is worse than America, because like I mentioned in the previous question, they hold a lot of power and could drastically effect things on the international stage if they really wanted to, and it should be pretty obvious by now the American government isn't all that interesting in cooperating with the rest of the world.

    9. Do you feel that each person has a responsibility to participate in the political process?

    No. I believe people have the right not to vote if they think none of the candidates are up to scratch. I also believe people have the right to just not have an opinion.
    Last edited by Napalmbrain; 01-04-2008 at 09:38 AM.



    I never add friend codes.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndThen?
    @ROB64 - The longer you spend on this forum, the more you realise that Napalmbrain knows a lot about everything.


  6. #25
    A li'l bit different Squall7's Avatar
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    This thread only goes to prove that a political section is needed on these forums.

    Personally, I wouldn't care if restrictions such as absolutely no foul language, racial persecution etc... were enforced more strictly. In the end, I think it's a bad decision to force people to go elsewhere to talk about politics, especially at a time like this (with the elections for US President near).

    Heck, it'll also give the site a better rep, because it'll be obvious that Wii gamers aren't all "kiddies", and that inteligent discussion can and will happen.


    Mail me if you want to add me on either the Wii or the 360.


  7. #26
    Anglophobiphile Brawny's Avatar
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    I forgot to give my thanks to all who posted! If this thing doesn't get an A, I'll be so pissed and blame it all on you guys.

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