LoginRegister
Nintendo Wii / Wii U Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Wii Nerd gamechaser001's Avatar
    Member #
    7118
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    432
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    2291-3059-0957-1397

    Wireless Sensor Bar

    I bought and salvaged parts to make a wireless sensor bar (IR LEDs, wire, battery connector, etc), the sensor bar that comes with the Wii is too short for what I need and my cats keep playing with the wire and bbreaking the wire inside it right now I am using my can lights I have in my basement (where my Wii is located most of the time), thing is it's a 50-50 chance that I can click on what I want, given if the hand-cursor thing even shows up

    The question is, if I use a 9V battery, do i need a resistor or should it work without one? I think I heard somewhere that if you don't use a resistor, there is a shorter life span on the IR LEDs, is this true? And if it is true, roughly how long is the life span?

  2. Ads


  3. #2
    Wii-Dev Oldschool Smasher's Avatar
    Member #
    8619
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    43
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    Quote Originally Posted by gamechaser001
    I bought and salvaged parts to make a wireless sensor bar (IR LEDs, wire, battery connector, etc), the sensor bar that comes with the Wii is too short for what I need and my cats keep playing with the wire and bbreaking the wire inside it right now I am using my can lights I have in my basement (where my Wii is located most of the time), thing is it's a 50-50 chance that I can click on what I want, given if the hand-cursor thing even shows up

    The question is, if I use a 9V battery, do i need a resistor or should it work without one? I think I heard somewhere that if you don't use a resistor, there is a shorter life span on the IR LEDs, is this true? And if it is true, roughly how long is the life span?
    about a year or half a year. And yes you need a resistor in order to get that puppy working. Some resistors have a bit of a longer life span but are amybe too big for what you might need to do. Does the size matter for your project?

  4. #3
    Junior Member sreg0r's Avatar
    Member #
    9281
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    I wouldn't suggest running the IR LED's a 9V, You'll burn them out instantly.
    What current does your circuit require? just use ohm's law. If you don't have a basic electronics knowledge you should probably follow a guide step-by-step from the net to avoid wasting your money on blown electronics.

  5. #4
    Wii Nerd gamechaser001's Avatar
    Member #
    7118
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    432
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    2291-3059-0957-1397
    Quote Originally Posted by sreg0r
    I wouldn't suggest running the IR LED's a 9V, You'll burn them out instantly.
    What current does your circuit require? just use ohm's law. If you don't have a basic electronics knowledge you should probably follow a guide step-by-step from the net to avoid wasting your money on blown electronics.
    Well, the options are 9V (which I've seen have been used on other IR sensor/emitter devices), D, AA, or an outlet adapter with the exact required current, I want to lean away from an outlet adapter though, I have quite a bit of knowledge in the electronics field (mostly in the computer field), i'm new on the LED side of things, but i'm sure I could pick it up pretty quick, I was expecting a sheet of specs with the LEDs when I purchased them, but to no avail, I was just wondering what the mainstream requirements were to make one, are there any sites that I can use for pointers?
    Last edited by gamechaser001; 12-26-2006 at 11:13 PM. Reason: forgot to add someting

  6. #5
    Wii online moderator registerednerd's Avatar
    Member #
    249
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Missouri, United States
    Posts
    1,054
    Friends
    1
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    Under a 9V, you'll need a resistor. As for how much, you'll have to use ohm's law to calculate (no, not the stuff with the cabbage), V=IR (V=voltage, 9 in this case; I=current in amps, find this on the packaging of the LED's; and R=resistance, this is what you want to solve for). Just use your basic reading and algebra skills and it should be no problem.
    ... but what do I know?...
    Not currently accepting friend adds.

  7. #6
    Wii Nerd gamechaser001's Avatar
    Member #
    7118
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    432
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    2291-3059-0957-1397
    Quote Originally Posted by registerednerd
    Under a 9V, you'll need a resistor. As for how much, you'll have to use ohm's law to calculate (no, not the stuff with the cabbage), V=IR (V=voltage, 9 in this case; I=current in amps, find this on the packaging of the LED's; and R=resistance, this is what you want to solve for). Just use your basic reading and algebra skills and it should be no problem.
    Thanks for the reply, is there a way to test for the amps? The packaging my LEDs came in don't have any documentation


    No spamming referral links - Further attempts at advertising will not be tolerated. kthx

    If you know anything about LEDs please put input, click on the link beliw, I can really use the help
    http://www.wiichat.com/nintendo-wii-...tml#post149729

  8. #7
    WiiChat Member viperjason's Avatar
    Member #
    12302
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    73
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    Thats easy.

    Here is a basic circuit for you......but keep in mind that using a 9V battery wont last long.....and without a switch....it will run all day long.
    LED's usually operate at 25mA. The max you can push an LED is up to the manufacture but I've seen them go as high as 0.5A (500mA). Until you get the right brightness for your LED, use a potentiometer. Ones you get the brightness right for good communication with wii, then mesure the OHM's of the potentiometer, and use that resistance resistor.

    If you dont have a way to mesure ohms, then using basic electronics, get a bunch of 50ohm resistors....Series to add the resistance together....parallel to divide the resistance in half.

    ----R----R---R (Series)
    ___R___
    ---| |---- (Parallel)
    ---R---
    + battery -> one side resitor
    Other side resitor -> Positive side LED (Long end)
    Negative side LED -> negative battery

  9. #8
    WiiChat Member xstatic's Avatar
    Member #
    9578
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    14
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    Keep in mind that a LED is basically a short circuit with a voltage drop across it.

    Assuming 1.7V and 25mA for your LED

    V=IR
    9V-1.7V=25mA*Rohms
    7.3/.025=292

    So try a 300 Ohm

  10. #9
    Wii-diculous tighr's Avatar
    Member #
    3507
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    28
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    2254-6848-7088-9365
    Whenever I need data sheets for specific parts, I use google. You can get part numbers from digi-key, and then google for that part number plus the phrase "data sheet". The specifications are generally found in those sheets.

    If you're not familiar with circuit design, I would reccomend doing some research first or ask someone else.

  11. #10
    WiiChat Member r00ntje's Avatar
    Member #
    12034
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    40
    Friends
    0
    Wii Friend Code: $post[field5]
    If you are really building your own sensor bar, keep in mind that putting the sensor farther apart will increase the precision. Or you could go without a sensorbar completely...

    I heard about some Japanese guy that found out that putting burning candles on both sides of your TV works even better then a sensor bar. Candles also emit infrared, so this could work. I havent heard much about other people trying this yet.

    Anyway, theres your basic wireless sensorbar.

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Similar Threads

  1. Wii internet simple wireless workaround!!
    By Swapmii in forum Nintendo Wii Online
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-11-2008, 08:36 AM
  2. Wireless DSL Can't Connect Wii..Hardwired OK
    By jmarkitell in forum Nintendo Wii Online
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-01-2008, 01:35 PM
  3. Wireless Nunchuck in the Making?
    By King Wiired in forum Nintendo Wii Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-07-2007, 02:11 PM
  4. Wireless Network Card - how to make it connect!
    By jvc_man in forum Nintendo Wii Online
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 01-07-2007, 09:45 AM
  5. Novice wireless internet user looking for some wii advice
    By DigestiveBiscuit in forum Nintendo Wii Online
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-06-2006, 04:00 PM

Search tags for this page

can wii play dvds
,
can+wii+play dvds
,
hooking wii up to your tx if sensor bar cord is cut
,
max voltage for wii sensor bar
,
wii ir sensor bar input voltage
,
wii ir sensorbar voltage
,
wii sensor bar batters input
,

wii sensor bar input voltage

,
wii sensor bar max voltage
,
wii sensor bar output voltage
,

wii sensor bar voltage

,
wii sensor bar voltage level
Click on a term to search for related topics.