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Wireless Sensor Bar

Discussion in 'Nintendo Wii Hardware' started by gamechaser001, Dec 26, 2006.

  1. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    I bought and salvaged parts to make a wireless sensor bar (IR LEDs, wire, battery connector, etc), the sensor bar that comes with the Wii is too short for what I need and my cats keep playing with the wire and bbreaking the wire inside it:mad5: right now I am using my can lights I have in my basement (where my Wii is located most of the time), thing is it's a 50-50 chance that I can click on what I want, given if the hand-cursor thing even shows up

    The question is, if I use a 9V battery, do i need a resistor or should it work without one? I think I heard somewhere that if you don't use a resistor, there is a shorter life span on the IR LEDs, is this true? And if it is true, roughly how long is the life span?
     
  2. Oldschool Smasher

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    about a year or half a year. And yes you need a resistor in order to get that puppy working. Some resistors have a bit of a longer life span but are amybe too big for what you might need to do. Does the size matter for your project?
     
  3. sreg0r

    sreg0r WiiChat Member

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    I wouldn't suggest running the IR LED's a 9V, You'll burn them out instantly.
    What current does your circuit require? just use ohm's law. If you don't have a basic electronics knowledge you should probably follow a guide step-by-step from the net to avoid wasting your money on blown electronics.
     
  4. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    Well, the options are 9V (which I've seen have been used on other IR sensor/emitter devices), D, AA, or an outlet adapter with the exact required current, I want to lean away from an outlet adapter though, I have quite a bit of knowledge in the electronics field (mostly in the computer field), i'm new on the LED side of things, but i'm sure I could pick it up pretty quick, I was expecting a sheet of specs with the LEDs when I purchased them, but to no avail, I was just wondering what the mainstream requirements were to make one, are there any sites that I can use for pointers?
     
    #4 gamechaser001, Dec 27, 2006
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2006
  5. registerednerd

    registerednerd Wii online moderator

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    Under a 9V, you'll need a resistor. As for how much, you'll have to use ohm's law to calculate (no, not the stuff with the cabbage), V=IR (V=voltage, 9 in this case; I=current in amps, find this on the packaging of the LED's; and R=resistance, this is what you want to solve for). Just use your basic reading and algebra skills and it should be no problem.
     
  6. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    Thanks for the reply, is there a way to test for the amps? The packaging my LEDs came in don't have any documentation
     
  7. viperjason

    viperjason WiiChat Member

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    Thats easy.

    Here is a basic circuit for you......but keep in mind that using a 9V battery wont last long.....and without a switch....it will run all day long.
    LED's usually operate at 25mA. The max you can push an LED is up to the manufacture but I've seen them go as high as 0.5A (500mA). Until you get the right brightness for your LED, use a potentiometer. Ones you get the brightness right for good communication with wii, then mesure the OHM's of the potentiometer, and use that resistance resistor.

    If you dont have a way to mesure ohms, then using basic electronics, get a bunch of 50ohm resistors....Series to add the resistance together....parallel to divide the resistance in half.

    ----R----R---R (Series)
    ___R___
    ---| |---- (Parallel)
    ---R---
    + battery -> one side resitor
    Other side resitor -> Positive side LED (Long end)
    Negative side LED -> negative battery
     
  8. xstatic

    xstatic WiiChat Member

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    Keep in mind that a LED is basically a short circuit with a voltage drop across it.

    Assuming 1.7V and 25mA for your LED

    V=IR
    9V-1.7V=25mA*Rohms
    7.3/.025=292

    So try a 300 Ohm
     
  9. tighr

    tighr Wii-diculous

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    Whenever I need data sheets for specific parts, I use google. You can get part numbers from digi-key, and then google for that part number plus the phrase "data sheet". The specifications are generally found in those sheets.

    If you're not familiar with circuit design, I would reccomend doing some research first or ask someone else.
     
  10. r00ntje

    r00ntje WiiChat Member

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    If you are really building your own sensor bar, keep in mind that putting the sensor farther apart will increase the precision. Or you could go without a sensorbar completely...

    I heard about some Japanese guy that found out that putting burning candles on both sides of your TV works even better then a sensor bar. Candles also emit infrared, so this could work. I havent heard much about other people trying this yet.

    Anyway, theres your basic wireless sensorbar.
     
  11. xstatic

    xstatic WiiChat Member

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    When I take our wii to the grandparents house I just use the recessed ceiling lights above the projection screen(wall).

    Doesn't allow pointing directly twords the screen but works fine for menus...
     
  12. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    yes, that is what I am doing now, kind of a pain where my Wii is located, I have to focus between a certain area in the room
     
  13. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    it's not that it requires infrared light, it just requires light period, remember infrared is an invisable beam of light that only IR recievers and cameras can read, that is why they are used on CCTV cameras for dark areas, so nobody knows that the CCTV camera can still detect in that area

    And i'm not putting candles on top of my LCD HDTV, narrow ledge, it could fall, also i'd get wax all over it

    also, I don't want light glaring in my eyes, that is why I went with IR, and the lights I use for focusing right now is a pain

    Ok, just so everybody knows my plan

    [​IMG]
     
    #13 gamechaser001, Feb 10, 2007
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2007
  14. Wiitendo

    Wiitendo Banned

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    Im a cover commer, so I would not suggest making one it looks tacky and cheap. Plus nyko(sp) just came out with a brand new wireless one. Its a bit bigger then the original one, but A. its wireless B. looksthe same. C. has a longer span (by a few feet)
     
  15. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    I agree, if it looks tacky, no point in using it, at least in a visible distance and location, but if it isn't visable to us, how is it visable to the Wii-mote? Anyway i've seen them online, and it's a good price too, but I already have the parts I need and for under $10, I can make 2, I already bought 10 LEDs for $6, I have the wiring, the only thing I need is the resistors, but there is no point buying resisors if you don't know your resistance, otherwise you bought trash can filler if you know what I mean, or they won't be bright enough for the Wii-mote

    Also, i'm too close to my television for a wider one to work
     
    #15 gamechaser001, Feb 10, 2007
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2007
  16. xstatic

    xstatic WiiChat Member

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  17. gamechaser001

    gamechaser001 Wii Nerd

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    true, if I can get one to work with parts i have laying around though, I think that would be better, $10 is a great price and all, but i'm in some really big money issues right now
     
  18. milisake

    milisake WiiChat Member

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    xstatic is right on in how to figure out resistance for the circuit. For basic run of the mill LEDs, figure 1.7 to 2 Vdc and 20 to 25mA current. I'd really recommend a datasheet to make sure you can get the max brightness out of the LEDs. Otherwise, as someone else pointed out, you can use a fine trim variable resistor initially set at 300 Ohms and adjust it for max brightness. Just be aware that you'll need something like a digital camcorder, camera or webcam so you can see the IR output and watch for when it peaks right before it burns out. Or you can just use a few visible red LEDs in place of the IRs to peak the circuit with instead.
     
  19. COLDshiver

    COLDshiver Wii Owner

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    @OP: Salvaging your Sensor bar? I don't think you need to take the sensor bar apart. All you need to do is cut the cord (lolz). Find a guide, someone cut the cable and put in a plug. Some resistors and stuff had to be done, but still you won't need to take apart the sensor bar. Also, i am making my own Sensor bar from scratch :D i got LEDs and Perf board and all that junk. Hope to have time to put it together...
     
  20. tighr

    tighr Wii-diculous

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    I would reccomend that you run several LEDs in parallel rather than two LEDs in series. You will get max brightness out of the LEDS if you arrange them in parallel because you are supplying them with the full voltage of your batteries rather than V/# of LEDs.
     

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